Many litigation lawyers know about the “litigation privilege” (sometimes called the “judicial privilege”).  The doctrine operates to immunize lawyers from liability for statements  made during the litigation process that are related to the litigation, even if they injure an opposing party.  (Here’s a 2015 Hofstra Law Review article that provides an overview.)

But lawyers

A New Jersey lawyer was suspended for six months for misrepresenting to clients for about eight years that their arbitration matter “was proceeding apace,” when he actually had never filed their claim.  The lawyer also concealed from his firm for almost two years the malpractice suit that the clients later filed, including the default judgment

We’ve written before about “web bugs” — tracking devices consisting of an object embedded in a web page or e-mail, that unobtrusively (usually invisibly) reveal whether and how a user has accessed the content.  Three jurisdictions (Alaska, New York and, most recently, Illinois) have issued opinions pointing to the ethics

The Ohio Supreme Court is continuing its trend of suspending lawyers who violate the disciplinary rule on sex with clients, and has again rejected arguments that pointed to the consensual nature of the relationship.  In a recent opinion involving sex between criminal defense counsel and his client, the court characterized the lower disciplinary Board’s analysis